Home >> Women-Health >> Women-Fitness

Women's Poll
Question: Should the government make the HPV vaccine mandatory?

 


Knowing the Basics

Physical fitness is most easily understood by examining its components, or “parts.” There is widespread agreement that these five components are basic:

Cardio-respiratory Endurance

The ability to deliver oxygen and nutrients to tissues, and to remove wastes, over sustained periods of time. Long runs and swims are among the methods employed in measuring this component.

Muscular Strength

The ability of a muscle to exert force for a brief period of time. Upper-body strength, for example, can be measured by various weight-lifting exercises.

Muscular Endurance

The ability of a muscle, or a group of muscles, to sustain repeated contractions or to continue applying force against a fixed object. Pushups are often used to test endurance of arm and shoulder muscles.

Flexibility

The ability to move joints and use muscles through their full range of motion. The sit-andreach test is a good measure of flexibility of the lower back and backs of the upper legs.

Body Composition

Often considered a component of fitness. It refers to the makeup of the body in terms of lean mass (muscle, bone, vital tissue and organs) and fat mass. An optimal ratio of fat to lean mass is an indication of fitness, and the right types of exercises will help you decrease body fat and increase or maintain muscle mass.


Home   |   About Us   |   Contact Us   |   Privacy   |   Terms Of Use   |   Advertise With Us   |   Sitemap
Copyright © 2019 Responsive Health
This site is intended to provide you with health information from publicly available sources, supporting vendors and partnered sources. While We make every effort to ensure that the information on this site is accurate, We make absolutely no assumption, inference, or declaration stating the information provided should be use as a source influencing any decisions on medical, diagnosis or treatment, or advice about what providers to use. The Site is an informational resource used for educational purposes only and cannot be used as a source used to make changes to medical treatment or lifestyle decisions without first consulting with your physician.